OUR RESPONSE TO THE COVID-19 OUTBREAK

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Dahlia Home Renovations, Inc., is OPEN for business and fully operational.

 

Here is our new guidelines to make sure everyone stays safe and healthy:

Social distancing

  • Limit work in occupied areas to only those tasks that are strictly necessary.
  • Limit physical contact with others. Direct employees to increase personal space to at least six feet where possible.
  • When possible, limit out-of-office meetings and replace them with phone or online meetings.
  • Take breaks and lunch in shifts to reduce the size of the group in the lunch area at any one time to fewer than 10 people.
  • Subcontractor foremen and project managers should communicate with their general contractors about prohibiting large gatherings (currently no more than 10 people) on the job site, such as the all-hands meeting and all-hands lunches.

Personal protective equipment (PPE)

  • Gloves: Gloves should be worn at all times while on site. The type of glove worn should be appropriate to the task. If gloves are not typically required for the task, then any type of glove is acceptable, including latex gloves.
  • Eye protection: Eye protection should be worn all times while on site.
  • Face masks: The CDC is currently not recommending that healthy people wear face masks. On March 17, 2020, the federal government asked all construction companies to donate N95 masks to local hospitals and forego future orders. Contractors should continue to provide – and direct employees to wear – face masks if the work requires it. Dahlia Home Renovations, Inc., will use whatever face protection that is available at all times. 

Sanitation and cleanliness

  • Promote frequent and thorough hand washing with soap and running water for at least 20 seconds. Employers should also provide hand sanitizer when hand-washing facilities are not available. Consult the CDC’s When and How to Wash Your Hands.
  • All workers should wash their hands often, especially before eating, smoking, or drinking, and after blowing their noses, coughing, or sneezing. They should refrain from touching their faces.
  • All sites should have hand-washing stations readily available to all workers. If you have a large site, get a hand-washing station from your portable job site toilet provider.
  • Providing hand sanitizer is acceptable in the interim between the availability of hand-washing facilities.
  • All workers should wash their hands before and after entering any workspace, as well as regularly and periodically throughout the day.
  • Employees performing cleaning must be issued proper PPE, such as nitrile gloves and eye or face protection as needed.
  • Any trash from the trailers or the job site should be changed frequently by someone wearing gloves. After changing the trash, employees should throw the gloves away and wash their hands.

Workers entering occupied buildings and homes

Many contractors and service technicians perform construction and maintenance activities within occupied homes, office buildings, and other establishments. Although these are not large job sites, they present their own unique hazards involving potential COVID-19 exposures. Plumbers, electricians, and heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning technicians are examples of workers who perform work at such locations. All such workers should evaluate the specific hazards when determining best practices.

  • Require the customer to clean and sanitize the work area before workers arrive on site.
  • Technicians should sanitize the work areas themselves when they arrive, throughout the workday, and immediately before they leave. Consult the CDC’s Clean & Disinfect.
  • Require customers to keep household pets away from the work area.
  • Ask that occupants keep a personal distance of at least 10 feet.
  • Do not accept payments on site (no cash or checks exchanged). Require electronic payments over the phone or online.
  • Workers should immediately wash hands before starting and after completing the work. Consult the CDC’s When and How to Wash Your Hands.

 

More information on these and other Oregon guidelines can be found HERE

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